Category Archives: Economy

Artificial Intelligence – Depth First Search(DFS)

Depth-first search (DFS) is an algorithm for traversing or searching tree or graph data structures. One starts at the root (selecting some arbitrary node as the root in the case of a graph) and explores as far as possible along each branch before backtracking.

A version of depth-first search was investigated in the 19th century by French mathematician Charles Pierre Trémaux[1] as a strategy for solving mazes.

Algorithmic Thoughts - Artificial Intelligence | Machine Learning | Neuroscience | Computer Vision

Okay! So this is my first blog post!

I will start by talking about the most basic solution to search problems, which are an integral part of artificial intelligence.

What the hell are search problems?

In simple language, search problems consist of a graph, a starting node and a goal(also a node). Our aim while solving a search problem is to get a path from the starting node to the goal.

Consider the diagram below, we want to get to the node G starting from the node S.

Which path will we get on solving the search problem? How do we get the path? This is where algorithms come into picture and answer all our questions! We will look at Depth First Search which can be seen as a brute force method of solving a search problem.

Creating the search tree

So how do we simplify this problem? If we…

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Behavioral economics

Behavioral economics, along with the related sub-field behavioral finance, studies the effects of psychological, social, cognitive, and emotional factors on the economicdecisions of individuals and institutions and the consequences for market prices, returns, and resource allocation, although not always that narrowly, but also more generally, of the impact of different kinds of behavior, in different environments of varying experimental values.[1] Behavioral economics is primarily concerned with the bounds of rationality ofeconomic agents. Behavioral models typically integrate insights from psychology, neuroscience and microeconomic theory; in so doing, these behavioral models cover a range of concepts, methods, and fields.[2][3]

The study of behavioral economics includes how market decisions are made and the mechanisms that drive public choice. The use of the term “behavioral economics” in U.S. scholarly papers has increased in the past few years, as shown by a recent study.[4]

There are three prevalent themes in behavioral finances:[5]